Customizing WordPress Jetpack Mobile Theme

JetPack by WordPressI have successfully using Jetpack Mobile Theme to serve the mobile version of my blogs, as of now it uses a theme called minieleven (that is starting to look a bit old…), with some tweaks here and there it can shine brighter and be customized to your taste, but unfortunately you can’t use a child theme, so other strategies must be used, so all the hard work isn’t wiped out by an update (and you do your updates, right?).

The plug-in native customization options are rather weak. You can customize, excerpts or full posts in home/archive/search pages, hide or show featured images, and display a promo for WordPress mobile apps. And that’s it, no more customization options for the mobile theme. Actually (never tried myself) if your main theme has colour and background options they should be picked up. And that’s it. From that point onward it’s up to you. So here we go…

First, if you are using Adsense for monetization, you will probably will notice that the Adsense mobile ads come with a nasty yellow background and cropped at the far right. The fix is very easy, go to Jetpack-> Options -> Custom CSS (be sure to check Mobile-compatible to Yes and simply add this:

.mobile-theme ins.adsbygoogle {
background-color: transparent !important;
}

.mobile-theme ins.adsbygoogle iframe {
width: inherit !important;
}

This is an important concept, as from here you can CSS override anything in the mobile theme, just be sure to prefix your selector with the .mobile-theme class, so you don’t mess up the desktop version.

This is all good for minor adjustments, and let’s say honestly this Jetpack feature is a little bit dumb, because it adds the custom CSS both to the mobile and the desktop version, actually to act on mobile you must switch an option and append the .mobile selector. This is dumb because to customize a desktop theme you simply create a child theme…. let’s say you want to use your own font with font-face, .mobile @font-face simply wont work.

The best bet for anything more than simple teaks is to create your own plug-in that pulls a specific style-sheet for the jetpack mobile version. A plug-in to customize other plug-in, wordpress is getting a bit tricky. happily this is quite easy, create a directory inside your /wp-content/plugins/ directory, let’s say jetpack-mobile-customizer and create a new file called jetpack-mobile-customizer.php with this content:

<?php
/**
 * @package Jetpack Mobile Customizer
 * @version 0.1
 *//*
Plugin Name: Jetpack Mobile Customizer
*/
// Check if we are on mobile
function jetpackme_is_mobile() {

    // Are Jetpack Mobile functions available?
    if ( ! function_exists( 'jetpack_is_mobile' ) )
        return false;

    // Is Mobile theme showing/not showing?
    if ( isset( $_COOKIE['akm_mobile'] ) && $_COOKIE['akm_mobile'] == 'false' )
        return false;

    if ( isset( $_COOKIE['akm_mobile'] ) && $_COOKIE['akm_mobile'] == 'true' )
        return true;


    return true;
}

function jetpackme_add_css() {
    if ( jetpackme_is_mobile()) {
        wp_register_style('custom_jpmobile_style', 
                          '/wp-content/themes/my-child-theme/jpmobile_style.css');
        wp_enqueue_style('custom_jpmobile_style');
    }
}

add_action('wp_enqueue_scripts', 'jetpackme_add_css');

?>

and customize on line 26 your (child) theme and css. Now, just place all the CSS stuff on this file and it will be applied only to the jetpack mobile site.

To customize the number of posts showed on the mobile version (probably 5 posts it’s a bit overwhelming on hand-held devices), just add this code to your plug-in:

function custom_posts_per_page() {
    if ( jetpackme_is_mobile()) {
        return 1; // mobile version posts number
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

add_filter('pre_option_posts_per_page', 'custom_posts_per_page', 10000);

And to customize the footer? Yes, again we go to the plug-in to add our stuff and hide the other stuff with CSS. On the plug-in add:

function jetpackme_custom_footer() {
    if ( jetpackme_is_mobile()) {
        global $wp;
        $current_url =  trailingslashit( home_url( add_query_arg( array(), $wp->request ) ) );
        echo '<span><a href="'.$current_url.
             '?ak_action=reject_mobile">Go to Desktop Version</a></span>'.
             '<p align="center">&copy; All rights reserved, yadayadayada</p>';
        return false;
    }
}

add_action('wp_mobile_theme_footer', 'jetpackme_custom_footer');

and in the CSS:

footer #site-generator {
        padding: 0 !important;
}

footer #site-generator > a {
        display:none;
}

So, there you go. Some clear ideas how to do the job of customizing the Jetpack Mobile Theme and surviving updates.

And now for a completely free bonus, a full customization of the menu and search. A more modern look and feel with everything hidden (menu items and search form) and of course replacing the ugly “Menu” and down arrow text with the ubiquitous 3 horizontal bars. Just open this blog with a mobile device or force the mobile view on this link.

We are using all the concepts previous explained and the very useful gettext filter. On the plug-in:

// Check if we are on mobile
function jetpackme_is_mobile() {

    // Are Jetpack Mobile functions available?
    if ( ! function_exists( 'jetpack_is_mobile' ) )
        return false;

    // Is Mobile theme showing?
    if ( isset( $_COOKIE['akm_mobile'] ) && $_COOKIE['akm_mobile'] == 'false' )
        return false;

    return jetpack_is_mobile();
}

function jetpackme_add_css_js() {
    if ( jetpackme_is_mobile()) {
        wp_register_style('custom_jpmobile_style', 
                          '/wp-content/themes/my-child-theme/jpmobile_style.css');
        wp_enqueue_style('custom_jpmobile_style');

        wp_register_script('custom_jpmobile_script', 
                           '/wp-content/themes/my-child-theme/jpmobile_script.js', 
                           array('jquery'));
    }
}

function fix_menu($translated_text, $text, $domain) {
    if ( jetpackme_is_mobile()) {
switch ( $translated_text ) {
case 'Menu' :
$translated_text = '<span>Menu</span>';
break;
case 'Termo' :
$translated_text = 'Pesquisar';
break;
 }
}

return $translated_text;
}

add_filter('gettext', 'fix_menu');
add_action('wp_enqueue_scripts', 'jetpackme_add_css_js');

The CSS:

.search-form #s, .menu-search {
background-color: transparent !important;
}

.menu-search {
-moz-box-shadow: none !important;
-webkit-box-shadow: none !important;
box-shadow: none !important;
margin: 0 0.6em 0 !important;
padding: 1% 2.5% !important;
padding-right: 0 !important;
padding-bottom: 0 !important;
margin-bottom: 0 !important;
width: auto !important;
height: auto !important;
}

.menu-search::after {
display:none;
}

#access {
width:50% !important;
}

#access h3::before {
    content: "\f419";
    color: #666;
font:1.3em "Genericons";
line-height:46px;
}

#access h3.menu-toggle {
color:#000 !important;
padding: 0 !important;
width: auto !important;
}

#access h3.menu-toggle span {
display:inline-block;
text-indent: -9999px;
}

#access .menu-toggle::after {
display:none !important;
}

#access ul.nav-menu {
left:0 !important;
background-color:#f1f1f1 !important;
-moz-box-shadow: none !important;
-webkit-box-shadow: none !important;
box-shadow: 0 2px 2px -2px #999 !important;
padding: 0 !important;
border-bottom:1px solid rgba(0,0,0,0.1) !important;
margin-top:3px !important;
}

#access ul.nav-menu li {
margin: 0 0.6em 0 !important;
padding: 0 2.5% !important;
border-bottom: 0 !important;
}

#access ul.nav-menu li a {
display:block !important;
padding:1em 0 !important;
}

#access ul.nav-menu::before {
display:none !important;
}

.search-form {
width:49% !important;
display:none;
}

.search-form #s {
border:1px solid #ddd !important;
color:#999 !important;
padding: 0.3em !important;
}

.search-form #s:focus {
font-size: 1em !important;
color:#000 !important;
padding: 0.3em !important;
}

And the extra Javascript file loaded in the plug-in:

(function($) {
$('h3.menu-toggle').click(function() {
if ($(this).hasClass('toggled-on') == true) {
$('div.search-form').show(500);
} else {
$('div.search-form').hide();
}
});
})(jQuery);

Comments, thoughts or other stuff feel free to use the comment box bellow.

PHP get a Youtube video duration

To make this work you need to go to Google Developers Console, create a project, enable the YouTube Data API v3, and get a key in authentication key in credentials. This is pretty much the difficult part.

Now the easy part, so easy and keystroke economic to do this in PHP… just a couple of lines, and it’s done:

define("API_KEY", ""); // Fill in your Google API Key
function getYoutubeDurationV3($id) { 
  $json = json_decode(
            file_get_contents('https://www.googleapis.com/youtube/v3/videos'.
                              '?part=contentDetails&d='.$id.'&key='.API_KEY)
          ); 

  $start   = new DateTime('@0');
  $youtube = new DateTime('@0'); 
  $youtube->add(new DateInterval($json->items[0]->contentDetails->duration));
    
  return $youtube->getTimestamp() - $start->getTimestamp();
}

Continue reading “PHP get a Youtube video duration”

Parsing Media RSS with PHP SimpleXML

Parsing XML docs with PHP SimpleXML is pretty straightforward. Yesterday i lost around 5 minutes to parse a Media RSS XML, and that was weird because normally with SimpleXML you take like 30 seconds… A Media RSS (MRSS) document is just a RSS with media extensions:

<rss version="2.0" xmlns:media="http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/">
  <channel>
    <title>RSS Title</title>
    <link>http://www.domain.com/mylink</link>
    <description>My description</description>
    <item>
      <title>Title item 1</title>
      <link>http://www.domain.com/item_1.html</link>
      <description>Item 1 description</description>
      <guid>http://www.domain.com/item_1.html</guid>
      <media:content url="http://www.domain.com/item_1.jpg" height="240" width="320" />
    </item>
    <item>
      <title>Title item 2</title>
      <link>http://www.domain.com/item_2.html</link>
      <description>Item 2 description</description>
      <guid>http://www.domain.com/item_2.html</guid>
      <media:content url="http://www.domain.com/item_2.jpg" height="240" width="320" />
    </item>
    .... etc 
  </channel>
</rss>

The “problem” is to access the media:content or the other media:* elements. But don’t worry I’m going to show you how to do it 🙂

$xml = simplexml_load_file('http://domain.com/mrss.xml');
$namespaces = $xml->getNamespaces(true); // get namespaces

// iterate items and store in an array of objects
$items = array();
foreach ($xml->channel->item as $item) {

  $tmp = new stdClass(); 
  $tmp->title = trim((string) $item->title);
  $tmp->link  = trim((string) $item->link);
  // etc... 
  // now for the url in media:content
  //
  $tmp->media_url = trim((string) 
                    $item->children($namespaces['media'])->content->attributes()->url);

  // add parsed data to the array
  $items[] = $tmp;
}

There, a piece of cake!

UPDATE

I received a comment about Picasa RSS feed, where you have to dig just a bit deeper, as the media:url is inside a media:group. The XML feed is as follows

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<rss xmlns:atom='http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom' 
xmlns:media='http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/' 
xmlns:openSearch='http://a9.com/-/spec/opensearchrss/1.0/' version='2.0'>
  <channel>
    <atom:id>https://picasaweb.google.com/data/feed/base/user/103218581909188195000</atom:id>
    <lastBuildDate>Wed, 16 Apr 2014 07:28:42 +0000</lastBuildDate>
    <title>Galerie fotografií uživatele Jiřetín JINAK</title>
    .... etc
    <item>
      <pubDate>Thu, 10 Apr 2014 07:16:22 +0000</pubDate>
      <atom:updated>2014-04-16T07:28:42.202Z</atom:updated>
      <author>Jiřetín JINAK</author>
      .... etc
      <media:group>
        <media:content url='https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-C6WmXjRnV8Y/U0ZFRnm-ujE/AAAAAAAAAPQ/AbwIc0Ycugk/s100-c/RizikovaMistaVHornimJiretine.jpg' type='image/jpeg' medium='image'/>
        <media:credit>Jiřetín JINAK</media:credit>
        <media:description type='plain'/>
        <media:keywords/>
        <media:thumbnail url='https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-C6WmXjRnV8Y/U0ZFRnm-ujE/AAAAAAAAAPQ/AbwIc0Ycugk/s160-c/RizikovaMistaVHornimJiretine.jpg' height='160' width='160'/>
        <media:title type='plain'>Riziková místa v Horním Jiřetíně</media:title>
      </media:group>
    </item>
    .... etc
  </channel>
</rss>

The PHP code follows the same logic, just add another step to take into account media:group

$xml = simplexml_load_file('http://picasaweb.google.com/data/feed/...&prettyprint=true');
$namespaces = $xml->getNamespaces(true); // get namespaces

$items = array();
foreach ($xml->channel->item as $item) {

  $tmp = new stdClass();
  $tmp->title = trim((string) $item->title);
  $tmp->link  = trim((string) $item->link);
  // etc...

  // now for the data in the media:group
  //
  $media_group = $item->children($namespaces['media'])->group;

  $tmp->media_url =    trim((string)
                       $media_group->children($namespaces['media'])->content->attributes()->url);
  $tmp->media_credit = trim((string)
                       $media_group->children($namespaces['media'])->credit);
  // etc

  // add parsed data to the array
  $items[] = $tmp;
}

Raspberry PI follow-up

raspberry_pi_logoSo, i did get a (actually 2) Raspberry PI and did get it up and running, it was time to do anything useful with it…

Time to setup a Samba server for network recording of security camera feeds. I went along with SWAT, a web based graphical interface to samba configuration. Like all Debian based software, the installation process is pretty straight forward,

apt-get update
apt-get install swat

And auto-magically it installs everything that you need, it evens adds the needed configuration line to /etc/inetd.conf 🙂

[global]
        netbios name = INTRANET
        server string = %h server
        map to guest = Bad Password
        syslog = 0
        log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m
        max log size = 1000
        dns proxy = No
        guest account = nobody
        usershare allow guests = Yes
        panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d
        idmap config * : backend = tdb

[public1]
        comment = Samba Public 1
        browsable = yes
        public = yes
        writable = yes
        read only = No
        guest ok = Yes
        path = /media/usb0/samba/cam1/

[public2]
        comment = Samba Public 2
        browsable = yes
        public = yes
        writable = yes
        read only = No
        guest ok = Yes

Then just point your browser to the PI ip at port 901. Curious enough, i found the SWAT tool too complex for the simple configuration that i wanted: i trust all users in the network, so my need was just two shares that anyone could read/write. So, i ditch SWAT and went on to good ol’style configuration file editing. The final /etc/samba/smb.conf that is working for me:

Fired up samba
# service samba restart

And the cams had no problem finding the samba shares and recording into them.

Next step was to get an easy way to navigate and download recordings. Of course you can also use the samba shares to navigate and read, but specially to outside access it would implied to configure a VPN access to the network (you don’t want your security camera feeds exposed in the Internets with read/write permissions to the world, right?). I went for HTTP with some kind of a file explorer software that allows users/permissions, file/directory browsing, and file download. For the server part i opted for lighttpd, a small footprint server, and for the voodoo PHP (all pretty familiar technology to me). Again the installation is for dummies:

apt-get install lighttpd
apt-get install php5-cgi

Then just a tiny adjustment at /etc/lighttpd/lighttpd.conf:

index-file.names            = ( "index.php", "index.html", "index.lighttpd.html" )
static-file.exclude-extensions = ( ".php", ".pl", ".fcgi" )

fastcgi.server = ( ".php" => ((
                     "bin-path" => "/usr/bin/php-cgi",
                     "socket" => "/tmp/php.socket"
                 )))

and restart it. For the software i went for the super nice, cool and powerful AjaXplorer. Just download it and untar to /var/www directory. Then point your browser to PI and log in with admin/admin (changed the password) and then it was just a matter of setting up a user account and a repository pointing to /media/usb0/samba/ (the parent directory of both samba shares).

Now, only one thing left, clean up and report. What to use? Of course PHP again. But this one in command line, so i installed the CLI version.

apt-get install php5-cli

And i did i script that cleans up old recordings and send me a daily report email using basic functions and the great PHPMailer class.

require('phpmailer/class.phpmailer.php');

function deleteDir($dir, $days) {
    $now      = time();
    $diff     = 60*60*24*$days;
    $treshold = $now - $diff;

    $d = dir($dir);
    while (false !== ($entry = $d->read())) {
        if ($entry != '.' && $entry != '..') {
            $year  = substr($entry, 0, 4);
            $month = substr($entry, 4, 2);
            $day   = substr($entry, 6, 2);

            if (mktime(0, 0, 0, $month, $day, $year) < $treshold)
                exec("/bin/rm -rf ".$dir.$entry);
        }
    }

    $d->close();
}

function getDirUsage($dir) {
    exec("/usr/bin/du -sh ".$dir, $output, $return);

    if ($return > 0)
        return 0;

    $output = $output[0];
    $output = explode("\t", $output);

    return $output[0];
}

/*
 * DELETE OLD FILES, +30d
 */
deleteDir('/media/usb0/samba/cam1/video/', 30);
deleteDir('/media/usb0/samba/cam2/video/', 30);

/*
 * GET USED/FREE SPACE
 */
exec ('df -h', $output);
foreach ($output as $line) {
    if (strpos($line, '/media/usb0')) {
        $disk_line = $line;
        break;
    }
}

$disk_line = explode(" ", $disk_line);
$disk_line = array_values(array_filter($disk_line));

$disk_used_space = $disk_line[2];
$disk_used_perc  = $disk_line[4];
$disk_free_space = $disk_line[3];

/*
 *  GET YESTERDAY RECORDINGS USAGE
 */
$yesterday  = date("Ymd", time() - 60 * 60 * 24);
$cam1_space = getDirUsage('/media/usb0/samba/cam1/video/'.$yesterday.'/');
$cam2_space = getDirUsage('/media/usb0/samba/cam2/video/'.$yesterday.'/');

/*
 *  GET YESTERDAY RECORDINGS USAGE
 */
$yesterday  = date("Ymd", time() - 60 * 60 * 24);
$cam1_space = getDirUsage('/media/usb0/samba/cam1/video/'.$yesterday.'/');
$cam2_space = getDirUsage('/media/usb0/samba/cam2/video/'.$yesterday.'/');

/*
 * SEND REPORT EMAIL
 */
$mail = new PHPMailer();
$mail->IsSMTP();                            // telling the class to use SMTP
$mail->SMTPAuth = true;                     // enable SMTP authentication
$mail->Port     = 25;                       // set the SMTP port
$mail->Host     = "mail.domain.com";        // SMTP server
$mail->Username = "username";               // SMTP account username
$mail->Password = "password";               // SMTP account password

$mail->From     = "email@domain.com";
$mail->FromName = "Descriptive email";
$mail->AddAddress("my_email@domain.com");

$mail->CharSet = "UTF-8";
$mail->Subject  = "Cam Report";
$mail->Body     = "YESTERDAY RECORDINGS\n".
                  "Cam 1: $cam1_space\n".
                  "Cam 2: $cam2_space\n".
                  "\n\n".
                  "HDD SPACE STATUS\n".
                  "Free: $disk_free_space\n".
                  "Used: $disk_used_space ($disk_used_perc)\n";
$mail->WordWrap = 50;

if(!$mail->Send())
        error_log($mail->ErrorInfo);

Then just run it daily with cron
30 3 * * * /usr/bin/php /path/to/script/cams.php > /dev/null

For now that’s all, but i guess there will be more updates on the Raspberry PI as i have still some ideas floating in my head.

PHP Email validation function

My PHP email validation function nowadays is:

function isEmail($value, $network_validation = true) {

    // Create the syntactical validation regular expression
    // (broken in 2 lines for better readability)
    $regexp = "/^([_a-z0-9-]+)(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@".
              "([a-z0-9-]+)(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*(\.[a-z]{2,4})$/i";

    // Validate the syntax
    if(preg_match($regexp, $value)) {
        if (! $network_validation)
            return true;
   
        $tmp = explode('@', $value);
        $username  = $tmp[0];
        $domaintld = $tmp[1];
 
        // Validate the domain
        if (getmxrr($domaintld, $mxrecords) || checkdnsrr($domaintld, 'A'))
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}

This is for my own reference, maybe this is all messed up, so use it at your own risk.